Nishael Navnita Raj

NishaelName: Nishael Navnita Raj

School: School of Social Sciences

Faculty: Faculty of Arts, Law and Education

Degree of Enrolment: Masters Candidate

Research Area: Prosocial Responses towards a Female Facing a Career Setback: Moderating Role of Gender-Norm Violation and Blatant Sexism in the Workplace

Supervisor: Dr. James Johnson

Current Research Summary: This study will involve one of the first examinations of the extent that gender role violation will influence emotional responses (i.e., empathy) in a non-western country (i.e., Fiji). There will also be an assessment of which factors (e.g., attribution of responsibility, hostile sexism) might underlie the impact of gender role violation on empathic responding. This research will extend the prejudice literature and shed greater light on interpersonal bias in the Pacific Region. The present research will extend the literature in this area by exploring whether gender role violations will influence empathic responding for a woman who has suffered a career setback. There will also be an examination of whether such violation will influence empathic responding when there is clear evidence that the woman’s career setback might have been due to sexism. Finally, we will explore the extent that the influence of gender role violation on empathic responding was mediated by attribution of victim responsibility and/or hostile sexism.

Testimonial- Graduate Assistant Scholarship Scheme: The Graduate Assistant Scholarship Scheme has assisted me in advancing my education and research skills by providing me with the necessary tools and funding to carry out my proposed study. The Research Office has enabled me to not only use this opportunity to carry out a study that will hopefully benefit the Pacific Region, but they have also provided me with the opportunity to tutor undergraduates and help them in their learning processes as well. The Proposal I put forward and will conduct research and write my thesis on will greatly benefit women in the workplace who have been victims of blatant sexism due to perceived norm violations in the Pacific Region.