Environment, Sustainable Development and Climate Change

RTEmagicC_climate_change001.jpgClimate change is widely accepted as one of the greatest global challenges today. The Pacific Island Countries are particularly susceptible to its impacts due to their low-lying island and atoll nature. Their vulnerability is exacerbated by a high dependence on natural marine resources for tourism and fisheries, which are already being affected by the rise in temperature and ocean acidification. This Strategic Theme builds on the work of the Pacific Centre for Environment and Sustainable Development (PACESD) and CROP agencies to provide effective, community-based and policy-level solutions for climate change adaptation, in collaboration with these institutions and other partners.

This SRT deals with the following broad themes: Community, Sustainable Livelihood and ESD; Marine Biodiversity and Resource Management, and Food Security and Climate Change.

 

 

Smart Water Quality Monitoring System in an automated irrigation Scheme to Reduce Environmental Impact on Fiji (WMISIF).

Project Leader: Dr Kabir Mamun

Team Members: Dr F.M Rabiul Islam, FSTE
Prof. Maurizio Cirrincione, FSTE
Dr Mahmood Rashid, FSTE
Dr MGM Khan, FSTE

Funding: $45,972.46

Duration: 3 years

Overview of Project

Low quality water for irrigation can impose a major environmental constraint to crop productivity. The results revealed from various researches [1-3] show that the water quality significantly effects the yield, water use efficiency (WUE) in addition to that impacts on soil (i.e. salinity build up), plants, human health and irrigation equipment [4]. Moreover excessive irrigation also increases the depth of the groundwater [5].

Water quality monitoring is vital for irrigation. Literatures [6, 7] show that the water quality monitoring systems are exists in few developed countries, but most of them are not automated. Frequent manual measurement of the water quality parameters is expensive which conducts by portable test kits or in the laboratory with the collected sample [8]. Therefore it is still a need for the development of a network based, automated, real time water quality measurement system which can provide instant data on water quality parameters and help to manage water quality in various applications including irrigation.

On the other hand; Automatic irrigation systems provide reliable operation and offer higher productivity by using water effectively and reduce human efforts. Various researches [9, 10] showed an automated/semi-automated irrigation system, but none of them are neither smart nor ensure quality water for irrigation.

Fiji Islands are located in the vast South Pacific Ocean and not yet tried to create either massive irrigation infrastructure or undertake large scale measures of soil water conservation in hilly regions. Hence this research will combine smart water quality monitoring device and automated smart irrigation system for sustainable environment of Fiji.

 

Anticipated Outcomes and Benefits:

The final outcome of this project will be the integration of the following two sub systems with user friendly interface through Internet of Things (IoT):

  1. A smart water quality monitoring system
  2. A smart irrigation system

Climate change in the tropics: understanding the past to prepare for the future

Project Leader: Dr Michelle McKeown

Team Members: Dr Eleanor John, FSTE
Prof. Juergen Boehmer, FSTE
Dr Stephen Galvin, FSTE
Dr Nick Rollings, FSTE
Dr Michael Schwarz, Flinders University of South Australia
Dr Mark Stephens, South Australian Museum
Dr Daniel Paivasilva, Instituto Federal Goiano
Dr Kevin Yaeger, University of Kentucky
Mr Carlos Chique, National University of Ireland Galway

Funding: $58,780

Duration: 3 years (mid 2016 – mid 2019)

Overview of Project

Most of the attention on the effects of climate change has been directed to the mid-high latitudes, which comprise most of the world’s leading economies.  This prject combines genetic research involving DNA sequencing, studies of subfossils in deep lake sediments, ecological and climate modelling, and geochemical analyses to unravel the history of environmental and climate change in the South West Pacific and its impacts on flora and fauna.  The lessons learnt from this project will help us anticipate the effects of future climate change in the tropics, and provide information that we can use to adapt to such future changes.

Snapshots of Fiji climate during the time of early settlement: giant clams from Lapita shell middens as archives of climate information.

Project Leader: Dr Eleanor John

Team Members: Dr Awnesh Singh
Dr Frank Thomas
Prof Patrick Nunn (University of the Sunshine Coast)
Ms Ros Kumar (University of Sunshine Coast)
Dr Stewart Fallon (Australia National University)
Dr Leslie Kinsley (Australia National University).

 

Funding: $46,060

 

Duration: July 1st 2016 to July 1st 2018

Overview of Project

This project will bring together the sceinces and the humanities in a novel and mutually beneficial way and provide an important insight in Lapita lifestyles and migration patterns.  It will also generate a record of interannual and seasonal climate dynamics for hte mid-Holocene at an unprecedented resolution for the region, thus making an important contribution to our understanding of climate systems in the southwest Pacific.

Investigation Of An Alternative Propulsion System For Sustainable Sea Transport

Project Leader: Prof Maurizio Cirrincione

Team Members: Dr Peter Nuttall ( PACE-SD,USP)
Dr David Aitchison (SEP, USP)
Dr Rabiul Ismam (SEP, USP)
Dr. Kabir Mamun (SEP,USP)
Mr Krishnil R Ram (SEP,USP)

 

Funding: $50K

 

Duration: 2.5 years

Overview of Project

There is a need to identify and implement sustainable sea transport solutions as the region is highly reliant on this mode of transport. A compressed air energy storage system (CAES) will be coupled with a Fuel Cell (FC) and suitable turbine/ air engine and generator to provide a new method of propulsion. The project aims to design, build and test a compressed air (or ‘pneumatic’) engine that uses the waste heat from a fuel cell. Both the fuel cell and compressed air engine will be used to generate electricity to drive a boat, thus creating a Pneumatic – Fuel Cell (P-FC) hybrid propulsion system. Marine propulsion requires a higher degree of reliability even if it may come at the expense of efficiency. The two propulsion systems used in this case can run independently of each other at lower efficiency if the need arises. This increases system reliability. The study is innovative as there is no such system built to date. A numerical model of the P-FC system will be created and the experimental results from the prototype P-FC hybrid drive will be used to correct the model and estimate performances of a large scale system.

Compressed air can be generated from renewables onshore and fed onto mini compressed air tanks (MCAT) on the boat. This storage of compressed air will allow it to be used as fuel to run small marine craft together with hydrogen fuel cell systems. A cost benefit analysis of the project will also be done to determine its feasibility for long term use.Such a propulsion system is innovative and holds promise for patents. The region would benefit the most from such a system as existing boats can be easily retrofitted. Journal and conference publications that result from this research will not only positively impact the university but add more knowledge to the field of sustainable sea transportation. Such an system can vastly reduce fossil fuel reliance of maritime crafts and make sea transportation more sustainable.

Investigating ciguatera fish poisoning in Fiji water hotspots-traditional ecological knowledge and biological processes of occurrence and accumulation in seafood

Project Leader: Dr Jimaima Lako

Team Members: Dr Sereima Naisilisili, FALE
Dr Susanna Piovano, FSTE
Dr Antoine De Ramon N’Yeurt, PACE-SD
Fiji Ministry of Fisheries and Forests
Ms Nanise Tuqiri

 

Funding: $50K

 

Duration: 18 Months

Overview of Project

This project aims at investigating ciguatera fish poisoning by focussing on two hot spots in Fiji; Senimuna in Kadavu and Kabara reef in Lau that had been identified through interviews from the PACE-NET + funded project entitled “Pilot Inventory of Traditional Knowledge of ciguatera fish poisoning and its treatment in the Pacific Island Region; Fiji and PNG”.  The two selected hot spots hav been known to be toxic and that all fish caught from these sites appear to be toxic.  To better understand the biological processess of occurence and accumulation in seafood, an experiment will be performed under controlled conditions and on selected fish speiceis as clearly explained in the methodology section . Results from this project will be used to prepare a paper that will be submitted to an ISI journal.

The first Pliocene sea-surface temperature record from the Southwest Pacific and its implications for regional climate predictions

Project Leader: Dr Eleanor John

Team Members: Dr Michelle McKeown, SGESE

Dr Awnesh Singh, PACE-SD
BSc and postgraduate students at USP (from SGESE, SMS, PACE-SD)

External Collaborators:

Prof Alan Haywood, UK
Prof Carrie Lear, UK
Dr Paola Moffa Sanchez, UK
Prof Richard Pancost, UK
Dr Gordon Inglis, UK

External Collaborators (other):

Mineral Resources Division, Fiji
South Pacific Consotium,
Geoscience Division, Fiji

 

Funding: $49,200      

 

Duration: July 1st 2016 to July 1st 2018

Overview of Project

In summary, the broad probles to be addressed here are : a) the need for more Pliocene climate change, particularly from the Pacific low latitudes b) a lack of understanding of how Pacific climate systems may operate in a warmer, higher CO2 world c)the difficulty in accessing suitable Pliocene deep-sea sediment archives in the Pacific low latitudes.

Improving Disaster Preparedness through More Effective Evacuation Planning

Project Leader: Dr John Lowry

Team Members: Dr Neelesh Gounder, FBE
Ms Chethna Ben, FBE
Dr Helene Jacot, PACE-SD
Dr Awnesh Singh, PACE-SD
Ms Camari Koto, FSTE
Dr Nick Rollings, FSTE
Dr Nathan Wales, FSTE
Dr Juergen Boehmer, FSTE

 

Funding: $49,631

 

Duration: 2 ½ years (expected start date Aug 2016)

Overview of Project

More than 40 people died as a result of Tropical Cyclone Winston. Many deaths occurred because people sought shelter in structures that were inadequate or because they did not know where to go for shelter. Access to safe shelter is a major concern during a cyclone and is a primary concern to the poor. Evacuation shelters in Fiji are typically schools, churches and other buildings believed to be structurally sound. Despite familiarity with cyclones and their risks, people often do not respond to cyclones in a proactive manner. For example, villagers on Koro Island were told of a potential storm surge, but did not fully understand what was meant by a “storm surge” or a “category 5 cyclone.”

The goal of this project is to produce knowledge about how disaster preparedness can be improved in Fiji though more effective evacuation planning. This will be achieved by meeting two primary objectives: 1) investigating the spatial accessibility of evacuation shelters in Fiji using geospatial data and methods, and 2) investigating how socio-cultural factors influence altitudes and actions of people in Fiji, and how lines of communication and education can be improved to better prepare for disaster.

Tropical cyclones affect all Pacific Island countries. The overarching goal of this project is to establish a centre of excellence in the knowledge and application of Disaster Risk Management at USP to serve the South Pacific region.

Mitigation mechanisms and recovering process after Cyclone Winston: A comparative study of four communities in Fiji

Project Leader: Dr Naohiro Nakamura

Team Members: Dr Yoko Kanemasu, FALE
Jovesa Tagivakatini, prospective MA research student and Fiji Bureau of Statistics    Statistician

 

Funding: $12,368

 

Duration: July 2016 to June 2017

Overview of Project

This project aims to identify recovery measures that have been taken by some remote communities after Cyclone Winston and aims to contribute to a better disaster planning in the context of Pacific Island countries. The project is particularly interested in how members of some communities responded to the damage caused by Winston and moved toward recovering, how traditional knowledge has contributed to mitigation mechanisms and recovering process and what can be learnt from these remote local communities. In countries with low priority with disaster management, such as Fiji, it might be critical for remote local communities to have self-mitigation mechanisms, as aid by the government and international community does not always quickly reach them. Existing literature on the impact of natural disasters and recovering process has observed progress made in developed countries, but not necessarily in developing countries with a few exceptions. Thus not only does this project contribute to literature on disaster management, it also provides practical knowledge of value to other remote communities. In effect, the project may contribute to facilitating remote communities to minimise the impact of severe natural disasters.

Natural Hazards detection, analysis and socio-economic impacts in the South Pacific Region - Fiji and Samoa

Project Leader: Associate Professor Sushil Kumar (USP)

Team Members: Dr MGM Khan (USP)
Dr Manoranjan Mohanty (USP)
Mr Abhikesh Kumar (USP)
Prof. Masashi Hayakawa, University of Electro‐Communications, Advanced Wireless
Communications Research Center, Chofugaoka, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan. Advisor/Collaborator.

Master Research Student: Possible 1 to 2 new GAs

Funding: FJD $ 45,600: Year 1; F$ 30,100, Year 2: F$ 6,900, and Year 3:F$ 5,700

Duration: 3.5 years

Overview of Project

This project addresses the issues on the detection, analysis, prediction, and reduction of the impact of natural hazards with reference to earthquakes and tropical cyclones, and explores strategies in enhancing the safety and human security in society, and help building more resilient and sustainable society, apart from the important scientific questions on their morphology in the South Pacific region.

Evaluation of Community Based Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management (CCDRM) Integration in Community Development Plans in Tonga and Fiji

Project Leader: Mr. Viliamu Iese (PACE-SD)

Team Members: Dr MGM Khan (USP)
Dr. Helene Jacot Des Combe (PACE-SD)
Dr. Robin Havea (USP)
Mr. Seone Lolesio (USP)
Dr. Morgan Wairiu (PACE-SD)
Ms. Annika Dean (UNSW)
Mr. Soane Patolo (General Manager – MORDI TT)
Mr. Taniela Hoponoa (MORDI TT – Tonga – Program Manager – LLEE)

Funding: FJD $ 50K

Duration: 19 months (January 2016 –  July 2017)

Overview of Project

Tonga and Fiji are highly at risk countries in terms of exposure and vulnerability to the impacts of natural hazards. Tonga was ranked 3rd and Fiji 16th in a global risk ranking study conducted in 2014.1 Disasters in these two countries have caused severe damages to infrastructure, basic services, loss of lives and livelihoods beyond the ability to respond, disrupting the normal functioning of the communities. Due to these regular impacts, governments and rural development sectors have recognized the need to shift from a reactive to a more proactive approach. They realized that reducing the risks through effective integration of climate change and disaster risk reduction at all levels would reduce the cost of damages when these adverse extreme events happen. Unfortunately, the “know how” to effectively integrate CC-DRM in development plans is still an emerging area of knowledge and research in the Pacific. Therefore, many ad hoc approaches and methods have been proposed and implemented in Pacific communities. To date, the type of method used depends on the person or organization involved. This leads to several problems such as increased confusion in the communities, communities feeling “burnt out” because of over-visitation from various actors, wasted time searching for the “supposed to be right” method causing delays in integrating plans and implementation and also limited ability to compare the risk levels between the communities within and between countries.

The UNDP/Live & Learn Pacific Risk Resilience Project (PRRP) is working closely with communities in the Western Division in Fiji and through MORDI TT in Tonga, to integrate CC-DRM in Community Development Plans. The partners identified the limitations of the current practices and requested a standardized method or tool kit to effectively integrate CC-DRM at the community level including pre-planning, planning and implementation phases. The main research question is: what are the existing CC-DRM integration tools in the Pacific and how can these tools be unified to create a standard tool for communities Pacific wide? The research team in this proposal is responding to the research need from stakeholders to critically and systematically analyze the existing methods and approaches on integrating CC-DRR in Tonga and Fiji and produce a standardized method that can be applied and implemented in other Pacific Island Countries. Tonga and Fiji were selected because of their advanced stage of CC-DRM integration at the community level. A Pacific wide CC-DRM Integration Tool Kit will be developed and published and community practitioners will be trained on how to use the tools. Furthermore, two publications in A-ranked Journals will be produced to share the findings of this research with the wider scientific community.

Sustainable Sea Transport Research Programme Extension

Cluster Sub-theme: SSTR Programme

Team Members: Prof. Elisabeth Holland, Dr Joeli Veitayaki and Dr Peter Nuttall

Funding: $66, 572.19

Duration of Project: 12 months from June 1st 2014 – May 31st 2015

Overview of Project:

This project is an extension of the existing Sustainable Sea Transport Research Programme (SSTRP) currently active under the SRT Programme.  SSTRP was initiated as a one-year funded action research catalyst to achieve a number of key objectives; primarily to establish the base literature in this field, organize the SSTT 2014, initiate key case study and prepare a long-term regional programme of research and action.  SSTRP has successfully commenced or achieved all the KPI set and will end on 31 May 2014.  However, the expected additional outcome of securing funding to roll-out the initial catalyst into a resourced long-term programme has not been achieved.  This project is to provide a further 12-month extension of the SSTRP to allow further incubation time and to continue negotiations between USP and various donor & partner organisations to secure long-term commitment to the resourcing of the programme either internally within the University or from external sources.

Pacific Community Development through fertilizer production and biofuel generations from the red seaweed Gracilaria edulis and other marine plants

Sub-theme: Pacific Community Development

Project Team Leader: Dr Antoine De Ramon N’Yeurt

Team Members: Dr Sarah Hemstock, Mr Viliamu Iese, Dr Giada Migliore, Lagoon Ecology and Aquaculture, Dr David P.Chynoweth, Dept of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, SPC-CETC, South Pacific Elixis Inc, Organic Matters Foundation, PODenergy.

Funding: $15,985

Duration: 2 years from Jan 2014 to Dec 2015

Overview of Project:

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Red Seaweed

This two years pilot project based in the Suva Lagoon with possible ramifications to Tuvalu and Vanuatu through co-funding proposes to explore the possibilities of developing for Pacific Island communities a low-cost highly effective seaweed and/or seagrass-derived agricultural fertilizer (in solid form and foliar spray) and a sustainable new source of renewable energy (biomethane) and that have the potential to develop the economy of local communities, create employment, reduce foods and fossil fuel imports, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase ocean species biodiversity, clean excess nutrients from seawage treatment plant discharges and cleaned up beaches fouled by seaweed.

Expanding the Network of Precise Temperature Measurements in Fiji Coral Reefs

Sub-theme: Network of Precise Temperature Measurements

Project Team Leader: Dr Antoine De Ramon N’Yeurt

Team Members: Dr Awnesh Singh, Prof. Elisabeth Holland, Prof. John Bythell, Dr Helen Jacot Des Combes, Ms Cherie Whippy-Morris, Dr Jerome Aucan, Dr Bernard Pelletier, Dr Jens Kruger, SPC-SOPAC; PCDF

Funding: $18,860

Duration: 2 years from April 2013 to Dec 2014

Overview of Project:

Coral Reef

Coral Reef

 

The acquisition of continuous and reliable field data on tropical oceanic temperature time series is essential for the development of climate models for predicting the impact of climate change on Pacific Islands Countries (PIC’s), notably concerning flooding, droughts, frequency and intensity of cyclone sea level rise and food security of local populations

Objectives:

  • To develop four additional seawater temperature monitoring sites in Fiji: Beqa, Rotuma Island,Vatu-i-Ra and Kadavu
  • To regularly retrieve data, rotate and maintain data loggers at all sites on a long-term basis
  • To process and upload the retrieved data to the USP and GOPS data portals to be freely available to the public, students, researchers and communities.

Climate Change and Food Security Assessment in Pacific Island Countries

Cluster Sub-theme: Food Security

Project Team Leader: Dr Morgan Wairiu

Team Members: Dr Jimaima Lako, Toni Fisher, Dr Othniel Yila, Dr Sushil Kumar, Cherie Morris, Kenneth Lameta, Mohammed Umar, Dr Sunil Kumar, Dr Jagdish Bhati, Dr Teweiariki Teaero, Viliamu Iese

Funding: FJD50,000

Duration of Project: 12 months from January 2012

Overview of Project:

This research project will investigate climate change impact on food security in USP member countries in the Pacific region and will be implemented in three phases. Phase I which forms this proposal will be a review of climate change and food security and will involve desktop study and site visits to gather relevant information and data from various reports; publications; databases; and relevant organizations and institutes throughout the USP member countries. It will review the food security situation in the Pacific islands and impact of climate change to determine research gaps and priorities.

Phase II will involve the selection of a number of vulnerable sites in the region and to carry out detail assessment on status on climate change impact food security. This will utilize lessons learned and best practices that are generated in Phase I. The assessment will also include socio-economic analysis on the impacts of climate change.

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Phase III will involve selection of adaptation options or measures and best practices for implementation in sites that are vulnerable to climate change. The cost-benefit analysis of adaptation options will also be carried out. Implementation of Phase II will start after completion of Phase I and then to be followed by Phase III.

The goal of phase I of this project is to document past and current research work on climate change and food security in PICs, identify information and research gaps and map out future research priorities and options. Phase I will be implemented over 12 months (January to December 2012) by twelve staff from all three USP faculties and PACE-SD who are members of the Research Theme: “Climate Change and Food Security” and will be assisted by a Research Assistant who will be hired under the project on a 12-month contract. The Research Theme Project Leader will provide coordination of the project activities under the guidance of the Research Cluster Team Leader.

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Completed Projects

Sustainable sea transport: sustaining the impetus of SSTT 2012 - SSTRP 1

Cluster Sub-theme: Sustainable sea transport

Project Team Leader: Prof. Biman Prasad

Team Members: Joeli Veitayaki, Vina Ram, Elisabeth Holland, Dr Peter Nuttall

Funding: $126,973

Duration: 1 year from 1st March 2013

Overview of Project:

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Sustainable Transport

In November 2012 USP hosted, on behalf of a collaboration of stakeholder organizations, the Sustainable Sea Transport Talanoa (SSTT) a 3-day international talanoa on the potential for developing alternative energy sea-transport options for Oceanic communities. The SSTT 2012 covered both heritage and future applications aspects of sustainable sea transport. The SSTT 2012 was an enormous success (possibly a world first), bringing together participants from across the globe, many attending electronically. There was strong interest from external participants in the Pacific shipping scenario and strong interest in attending a larger, more formal conference in 2014. The research field is broad, including technology, policy, economics, socio-cultural and climate change adaption and mitigation.

 

Outputs

Technical Reports

Project Title:Sustainable Sea Transport: Sustaining the impetus of SSTT 2012 – SSTRP 1

Project title – Climate Change and Food Security in PICs Project

  • 1 Technical Report in press under PACE-SD

Workshops

Title – Climate Change and Food Security Assessment in Pacific Island Countries

  • Workshop/consultation with all collaborative partners

Title – Pacific Community development through fertilizer production and biofuel generations from the red seaweed Gracilariaedulis and other marine plants

  • Community Workshop organised and held on 9th April 2014 at Veiseisei Village Community Hall for Veiseisei and Navutu villagers, NGO reps, Tourism Sector reps and the public

Journal Articles

Project Title:Sustainable Sea Transport: Sustaining the impetus of SSTT 2012 – SSTRP 1

  1. Holland, Elisabeth A. and Nuttall, Peter and Newell, Alison and Prasad, Biman C. and Veitayaki, Joeli and Bola, Amelia and Kaitu’u, John (2014) Connecting the dots: policy connections between Pacific Island shipping and global CO2 and pollutant emission reduction. Carbon Management, 5 (1). pp. 93-105. ISSN 1758-3004
  2. Nuttall, Peter and Newell, Alison and Prasad, Biman C. and Veitayaki, Joeli and Holland, Elisabeth A. (2014) A review of sustainable sea – transport for Oceania: providing context for renewable energy shipping for the Pacific. Marine Policy, 43 . pp. 283-287. ISSN 0308-597X
  3. Nuttall, Peter and Newell, Alison and Bola, Amelia and Kaitu’u, John and Prasad, Biman C. (2014) Policy and financing – why is sea transport currently invisible in the search for a low carbon future for Pacific Island countries? Frontiers in Marine Science, 1 (20). pp. 1-10. ISSN NA
  4. Prasad, Biman C. and Veitayaki, Joeli and Holland, Elisabeth A. and Nuttall, Peter and Newell, Alison and Bola, Amelia and Kaitu’u, John (2013) Sustainable sea transport research programme: toward a research – based programme of investigation for Oceania. The Journal of Pacific Studies, 33 (1). pp. 78-94. ISSN 1011-3029
  5. Nuttall, Peter (2012) Steering a course for the future with sticks, stones, grass and a little sharkskin: the case for revitalisation of sail technology and sailing culture as a practical sea – transport response to climate change and fossil fuel dependence and supply issues in Fiji. The Journal of Pacific Studies, 32 . pp. 163-175. ISSN 1011-3029
  6. Nuttall,P.,D’Arcy, P., and Philip, C. (2014) “Waqa Tabu – sacred ships: the Fijian Drua”. International Journal of Maritime History (1-24). doi: 10.1177/0843871414542736 (not in the repository)

Title – Pacific Community development through fertilizer production and biofuel generations from the red seaweed Gracilaria edulis and other marine plants

Books

Title – Pacific Community development through fertilizer production and biofuel generations from the red seaweed Gracilaria edulis and other marine plants

Conference Presentations


Project Title: Sustainable Sea Transport: Sustaining the impetus of SSTT 2012 – SSTRP 1

  1. Nuttall, P. (2013) “The Drua Files.” Presented at the 24th Annual Symposium on Maritime Archaeology and History of Hawai’i and the Pacific, 15-‐18 February 2013, Honolulu, Hawai’i.
  2. Nuttall, P. (2013) “The Glass is Never Empty.” Presented at the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Meeting, 13-‐15 June 2013, Saskatoon, Canada.
  3. Nuttall, P. (2013) “The Magnus Effect and the Flettner Rotor: potential application for Oceanic Shipping.” Presented at the 12th Pacific Science Inter-‐congress, 8-‐12 July 2013, Suva, Fiji.
  4. Newell, A. (2013) “Transport and Fuel Survey of Solodamu Village, Kadavu, Fiji.” Presented at the 12th Pacific Science Inter-‐congress, 8-‐12 July 2013, Suva, Fiji.
  5. Bola, A. (2013) “Sustainable Sea Transport Research Programme”. Presented at the UN NIPPON Conference, 16 October 2013, Suva, Fiji.
  6. Bola, A. and Kaitu’u, J. (2013) “Sustainable Sea Transport: Back to the Future”. Presented at the UNESCO 5th Pacific World Heritage Workshop, 27 – 30 November 2013, Suva, Fiji.
  7. Nuttall, P. (2014) “Is a Sustainable Sea Transport Future for Pacific Islands Possible?” Presented at the Asia Pacific Regional Initiative on Energy, Environment and Ecosystem: Nexus for Sustainable Development 3E conference, 24-‐25 February 2014, Male, Maldives.
  8. Newell, A. (2014) “Turning the Tide: the need for sustainable sea transport in the Pacific”. Presented at the Shipping in Changing Climates: Provisioning for the Future conference, 18-‐19 June 2014, Liverpool, UK.
  9. Bola, A. (2014) “Potential for Sustainable Sea Transport: A Case Study of the Southern Lomaiviti, Fiji Islands.” Presented at the Shipping in Changing Climates: Provisioning for the Future conference, 18-‐19 June 2014, Liverpool, UK
  10. Nuttall, P. (2014) “Transitioning to Low Carbon Sea Transport for Pacific Islands.” Presented at Expert Conference on Development of Island’s Sustainable Societies, 29-‐30 June 2014, Okinawa, Japan.
  11. Kaitu’u, J. (2014) “Turning the Tide: Transitioning to low carbon sea transport futures”. Presented at the 2nd Sustainable Sea Transport Talanoa, 14-‐18 July 2014, Suva, Fiji.
  12. Bola, A. (2014) “Potential for Sustainable Sea Transport: A Case Study of the Southern Lomaiviti, Fiji Islands.” Presented at the 2nd sustainable sea transport talanoa, 14-18 July 2014, Suva, Fiji.

Title – Pacific Community development through fertilizer production and biofuel generations from the red seaweed Gracilaria edulis and other marine plants

  1. 2014 (24 to 28 February). American Geophysical Union (AGU) Ocean Sciences Meeting, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Presentation of an oral paper on “Restoring ocean health and primary productivity with managed seaweed forests: a mass balance of carbon and nutrient cycles” and two posters “Pacific community development through fertilizer production and biofuel generation from marine biomass” and “Moving ocean policy from “take” to “give and take” with managed ocean seaweed forests”. Web page on USP project and presentations: http://oceanforesters.org/
  2. 2014 (21-28 June). Presented an oral paper at the 5th Congress of the International Society for Applied Phycology (ISAP 2014) in Sydney, Australia. Oral paper: Pacific Community Development Through Fertilizer Production and Biofuel Generation from the Seaweeds Gracilaria edulis and Sargassum polycystum (Authors A.D.R. N’Yeurt, S.L. Hemstock, V. Iese). Paper was successfully presented on Wednesday 25th of June.
  3. 2014 (14th to 18th July). Presented two oral papers at the Second International Conference on Climate Change and Renewable Energy (ICRECC) at the University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji, Paper titles: (1) Pacific Community Development through Biofuel Generation from Marine Biomas. (2) Small Island Community Ownership of Rural Electrification using Solar Energy – Rotuma Island Case Study. Both papers were successfully presented with interest shown from the public
  4. 2014 (15th-17th September). Presentation at the 2014 Asia Pacific Resilience Innovation Summit and Expo (APRISE2014), Honolulu Convention Center, Hawaii, USA. Finalist in the Islands Innovation and Pacific Agriculture Innovation Challenge 2014. Oral presentation: Pathways to Island Energy and Food Independence (Sarah Hemstock, Antoine D.R. Ramon N’Yeurt, Viliamu lese, Mark E. Capron, Jim Stewart, Frank Sudia, Mohammed Hasan). Poster: Seaweed-Biogas Pathways to Island Energy and Food Independence (Antoine D.R. N’Yeurt, Sarah Hemstock, Jim R. Stewart & Mark E. Capron).

Thesis

Title – Pacific Community development through fertilizer production and biofuel generations from the red seaweed Gracilaria edulis and other marine plants

Nearing Completion

  1. Student report MS311-Directed Study. 2014. “The Distribution of Gracilaria along the Nasese Foreshore Mudflats. By Samisoni Nalevuka Raiwalui (s11078267).
  2. Masters-level thesis on the anaerobic digestion of seaweeds for biofuel (2015-2016), Scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals on the anaerobic digestion of seaweed biomass for sustainable renewable energy and fertilisers, Possible patent to be lodged for the novel type of anaerobic digester; commercial applications and scaling-up for larger deployments for the tourism industry.
  3. Masters Thesis on the use of seaweeds as fertiliser for Pacific communities (2014-2015) Title: Assessing the effects of solid and liquid seaweed fertilizers on selected agricultural crops, Scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals on seaweed fertilisers in agriculture.

Other/Productions

Project title – Pacific Community development through fertilizer production and biofuel generations from the red seaweed Gracilaria edulis and other marine plants

a) Radio Interview: ‘Dateline Pacific’ on Radio New Zealand International 07/04/2014

“Nuisance seaweed to be put to good use in Fiji. Efforts are underway in Fiji to help communities power their homes and fertilise their crops with nuisance seaweed.”

Dr. Antoine De Ramon N’Yeurt of the Pacific Centre for Environment and Sustainable Development of USP spoke with Sally Round of Radio New Zealand International about seaweed being a good source of biomass, and the work carried out as part of this URC project to convert marine biomass into energy and fertilisers. The story was aired throughout the Pacific on 7th of April 2014 and was good publicity and visibility for the research carried out at the University of the South Pacific

Link to Audio File (mp4): Click Here

b) Online news interview article on the Scientific Development Network: “Seaweed Forests Could Help Power Tropical Islands” (SciDev.net 31/03/2014). Interview of Dr. Antoine D.R. N’Yeurt of PaCE-SD USP at the AGU Ocean Sciences Meeting in Hawaii by Jan Piotrowski about the biofuel/biofertiliser project at the University of the South Pacific. Click here for more info.

In Press Publications

Project Title:Sustainable Sea Transport: Sustaining the impetus of SSTT 2012 – SSTRP 1

  1. Newell, A. and Bola, A. (submitted) “Solodamu: A Survey of Fuel and Transport Use in a Coastal Village on Kadavu, Fiji”. Journal of Pacific Studies.
  2. Nuttall, P. and Kaitu’u, J. (submitted) “The Magnus Effect and the Flettner Rotor: potential application for Oceanic Shipping”. Journal of Pacific Studies.
  3. Nuttall, P., Newell, A., Smith, T., Bows-‐Larkin, A., Allwright, G., Gilpin, D., Traut, M. and Rynikiewicz, C. (in press) “Renewable Energy for Shipping: Technology Brief”. IRENA Bonn.
  4. Nuttall, P. and Veitayaki, J. (in press) “Oceania is vast, Canoe is centre, village is anchor, Continent is margin”. In H.D. Smith, et al. (eds) Earthscan Handbook of Ocean Resources Management. Earthscan Publications Ltd.
  5. Newell, A., Nuttall, P., Holland, E., Veitayaki, J. and Prasad, B. (in press) “Turning the Tide: the need for sustainable sea transport in the Pacific”. Marine Policy
  6. Bola, A. (in press) “Potential for Sustainable Sea Transport: A Case Study of the Southern Lomaiviti, Fiji Islands”. Marine Policy